Week of September 25 (NIGHT Class): Miguel Piñero’s Poetry and Drama

201206181054540.Miguel_Pi_ero_noticel
Announcements:

  • Groups have been finalized for presentations. Contact me immediately via email if for some reason you’ve missed sign-ups!
  • Continue working on your paper, due Tuesday October 2nd.

Tuesday, September 25th: We continue with Miguel Piñero’s poetry from Outlaw: The Collected Works. Read the following:

  • “Mango Dreams”
  • “Bastard Streets”
  • “New York City Hard Times Blues”
  • “And Then Came Freedom to Dream”
  • “Running Scared”
  • “Seeking the Cause”

Also read the Introduction to the “Drama of Miguel Piñero” in the front of Outlaw

Again, it’s not a lot of reading, but you need to read the poems slowly and carefully. Take good notes and think about the questions above as you read.

Questions to think about as you read:

  • Based on Piñero’s biographical story, how do/don’t his stories match the life he’s living?
  • How does Piñero’s work differ from Pietri’s in form or content?
  • What language does he use and what effect does that have on his poetry?
  • What audiences do you think Piñero is writing for?
  • How do the characters in Piñero’s descriptions of “Loisaida” (Lower East Side) differ from Pietri’s characters in El Barrio

For Thursday September 27th, read the play Short Eyes in Outlaw: [Reading questions and additional instructions to be added]

If you keep up with the weekly reading and take good notes, then you’ll be well prepared for the midterm and final exam and get much more out of the class!

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Week of September 25 (DAY Class): Miguel Piñero’s Poetry and Drama

201206181054540.Miguel_Pi_ero_noticel
Announcements:

  • Groups have been finalized for presentations. Contact me immediately via email if for some reason you’ve missed sign-ups!
  • Continue working on your paper, due Tuesday October 2nd.

Tuesday, September 25th: We continue with Miguel Piñero’s poetry from Outlaw: The Collected Works. Read the following:

  • “Mango Dreams”
  • “Bastard Streets”
  • “New York City Hard Times Blues”
  • “And Then Came Freedom to Dream”
  • “Running Scared”
  • “Seeking the Cause”

Also read the Introduction to the “Drama of Miguel Piñero” in the front of Outlaw

Again, it’s not a lot of reading, but you need to read the poems slowly and carefully. Take good notes and think about the questions above as you read.

Questions to think about as you read:

  • Based on Piñero’s biographical story, how do/don’t his stories match the life he’s living?
  • How does Piñero’s work differ from Pietri’s in form or content?
  • What language does he use and what effect does that have on his poetry?
  • What audiences do you think Piñero is writing for?
  • How do the characters in Piñero’s descriptions of “Loisaida” (Lower East Side) differ from Pietri’s characters in El Barrio

For Thursday September 27th, read the play Short Eyes in Outlaw: [Reading questions and additional instructions to be added]

If you keep up with the weekly reading and take good notes, then you’ll be well prepared for the midterm and final exam and get much more out of the class!

Week of September 18 (NIGHT Class): Miguel Piñero’s Poetry

201206181054540.Miguel_Pi_ero_noticel
Announcements: We finalized the schedule for group presentations in Thursday’s class. If you’ve somehow missed signing up for a group, email me immediately to get that straightened out.

The assignment sheet for the first paper was handed out on Thursday. Download it from the Assignments Page if you were absent/lost yours.

On Tuesday 9/18 there are no classes scheduled (PDF!) because of Yom Kippur.

Thursday, September 18th: We move on to Miguel Piñero and read poetry selections from the book Outlaw: The Collected Works. Read the “Introduction to the Poetry of Miguel Piñero” at the beginning of the book.

  • Then read:
  • “La Bodega Sold Dreams”,
  • “A Lower East Side Poem”,
  • “The Lower East Side is Taking” (p. 65!)
  • “The Book of Genesis According to San Miguelito”,
  • “This is Not the Place Where I Was Born”,
  • “Black Woman With the Blond Wig On”,
  • “Kill, Kill, Kill”. (Up to page 17.)

It’s not a lot of reading, however, you must read the poems slowly and carefully and choose 2 of them to read more than once. Take notes on key points that you think are significant, funny, interesting, or do a nice job of telling the story of the city. As with Pietri, while reading the intro at the beginning of the book with Piñero’s bio, look for cues from his life story that show how he approached his writing.

If you keep up with the weekly reading and take good notes, then you’ll be well prepared for the midterm and final exam and get much more out of the class!

Watch Piñero read “Seeking the Cause”

Questions to think about as you read:

  • Based on Piñero’s biographical story, how do/don’t his stories match the life he’s living?
  • How does Piñero’s work differ from Pietri’s in form or content?
  • What language does he use and what effect does that have on his poetry?
  • What audiences do you think Piñero is writing for?
  • How do the characters in Piñero’s descriptions of “Loisaida” (Lower East Side) differ from Pietri’s characters in El Barrio

Recap from this week’s class:

  • Finished Pedro Pietri’s Puerto Rican Obituary (See the Readings page for a PDF)

Week of September 18 (DAY Class): Miguel Piñero’s Poetry

201206181054540.Miguel_Pi_ero_noticel
Announcements: We finalized the schedule for group presentations in Thursday’s class. If you’ve somehow missed signing up for a group, email me immediately to get that straightened out.

The assignment sheet for the first paper was handed out on Thursday. Download it from the Assignments Page if you were absent/lost yours.

On Tuesday 9/18 there are no classes scheduled (PDF!) because of Yom Kippur.

Thursday, September 18th: We move on to Miguel Piñero and read poetry selections from the book Outlaw: The Collected Works. Read the “Introduction to the Poetry of Miguel Piñero” at the beginning of the book.

  • Then read:
  • “La Bodega Sold Dreams”,
  • “A Lower East Side Poem”,
  • “The Lower East Side is Taking” (p. 65!)
  • “The Book of Genesis According to San Miguelito”,
  • “This is Not the Place Where I Was Born”,
  • “Black Woman With the Blond Wig On”,
  • “Kill, Kill, Kill”. (Up to page 17.)

It’s not a lot of reading, however, you must read the poems slowly and carefully and choose 2 of them to read more than once. Take notes on key points that you think are significant, funny, interesting, or do a nice job of telling the story of the city. As with Pietri, while reading the intro at the beginning of the book with Piñero’s bio, look for cues from his life story that show how he approached his writing.

If you keep up with the weekly reading and take good notes, then you’ll be well prepared for the midterm and final exam and get much more out of the class!

Watch Piñero read “Seeking the Cause”

Questions to think about as you read:

  • Based on Piñero’s biographical story, how do/don’t his stories match the life he’s living?
  • How does Piñero’s work differ from Pietri’s in form or content?
  • What language does he use and what effect does that have on his poetry?
  • What audiences do you think Piñero is writing for?
  • How do the characters in Piñero’s descriptions of “Loisaida” (Lower East Side) differ from Pietri’s characters in El Barrio

Recap from this week’s class:

  • Finished Pedro Pietri’s Puerto Rican Obituary (See the Readings page for a PDF)

Week of September 11: (NIGHT Class) Pedro Pietri continued

On Tuesday 9/11 there are no classes scheduled (PDF!) because of Rosh Hashanah. (l’shanah tovah!) Note that we’re also off the following Tuesday, 9/18.

For Thursday 9/13, we continue with Pedro Pietri…

Pedro Pietri reading at the Poetry Project
Pedro Pietri reading at the Poetry Project

Continue Pedro Pietri’s poetry from the book Puerto Rican Obituary from the same PDF on the Readings page as last week. (Re?)Read “Puerto Rican Obituary” and “The Broken English Dream”. Also read “Suicide Note from a Cockroach”, “Love Poem for My People”, “Unemployed” and “OD”.

Now that we’ve covered some of Pietri’s life, think about how points from his personal outlook on religion, death, and the ambivalence toward the American Dream are reflected in the poems. Again, look for specific points that reveal how he approaches the subjects and make a note of them.

Think of the following questions as you read:

  • How does Pietri’s writing define the urban experience for the people he’s writing about?
  • What type of urban environment does he describe?
  • What language does he use and how does that reflect the urban situation?
  • Do you see any of the points Pietri makes in the interview reflected in the writing? Make note of a few examples.

Announcements:

  • If you missed class on Thursday 9/6, email me to choose a date for a group presentation.
  • Look for an update next week for the following reading assignment, though note that we’ll be moving on to Piñero’s Outlaw, so be sure to get a copy.

Recap from this week’s classes:

  • Finished the Juan Flores essay (See the Readings page for a PDF)
  • Skimmed Pedro Pietri’s interview (PDF also on the Readings page)
  • Started Puerto Rican Obituary (PDF also on the Readings page)

Week of September 11: (DAY Class) Pedro Pietri continued

On Tuesday 9/11 there are no classes scheduled (PDF!) because of Rosh Hashanah. (l’shanah tovah!) Note that we’re also off the following Tuesday, 9/18.

For Thursday 9/13, we continue with Pedro Pietri…

Pedro Pietri reading at the Poetry Project
Pedro Pietri reading at the Poetry Project

Continue Pedro Pietri’s poetry from the book Puerto Rican Obituary from the same PDF on the Readings page as last week. (Re?)Read “Puerto Rican Obituary” and “The Broken English Dream”. Also read “Suicide Note from a Cockroach”, “Love Poem for My People”, “Unemployed” and “OD”.

Now that we’ve covered some of Pietri’s life, think about how points from his personal outlook on religion, death, and the ambivalence toward the American Dream are reflected in the poems. Again, look for specific points that reveal how he approaches the subjects and make a note of them.

Think of the following questions as you read:

  • How does Pietri’s writing define the urban experience for the people he’s writing about?
  • What type of urban environment does he describe?
  • What language does he use and how does that reflect the urban situation?
  • Do you see any of the points Pietri makes in the interview reflected in the writing? Make note of a few examples.
  • Look for an update early next week for the following reading assignment, though note that we’ll be moving on to Piñero’s Outlaw, so be sure to get a copy.

Announcements:

  • If you missed class on Thursday 9/6, email me to choose a date for a group presentation.
  • Look for an update next week for the following reading assignment, though note that we’ll be moving on to Piñero’s Outlaw, so be sure to get a copy.

Recap from this week’s classes:

  • Finished the Juan Flores essay (See the Readings page for a PDF)
  • Skimmed Pedro Pietri’s interview (PDF also on the Readings page)
  • Started Puerto Rican Obituary (PDF also on the Readings page)

Week of September 4: (NIGHT Class) Juan Flores and Pedro Pietri

Pedro Pietri reading at the Poetry Project
Pedro Pietri reading at the Poetry Project

This is the update for the NIGHTTIME 7:45-9 PM Section. See the other post if you’re in the DAY class

Hi everyone,

First a few housekeeping things before we get to the assignment itself.

  • Remember to sign up for the class text message service from Remind. Send a text to 81010 with the message “@urbwrt2” (no quotes) to sign up. If that doesn’t work, send a text with the message “@urbwrt2” to (608)-467-4328.
  • If you do not have a cell phone capable of text messages, sign up for email notifications at: https://www.remind.com/join/urbanwrt2
  • You’ll also find it helpful to subscribe to new posts for this site: use the e-mail sign-up form on the main page.

We now move on to a significant poet and key person in defining the Nuyorican movement: Pedro Pietri

For Tuesday 9/4:

  • Review the key points of the Juan Flores essay that we covered Thursday: the points he makes here are key to the course.
    • What’s the relationship Flores poses between Caribbean communities in New York City and how does he see this as an alternative model to the Melting Pot Theory?
  • Read the interview with Pedro Pietri (PDF on the Readings page).
  • Apply Flores’s points to Pietri’s interview: that is, see if you can see similarities between Pietri’s life story and Flores’s points.

Think about the following [above] questions as you read and take notes on them:

  • To be added–watch for an update See above

For Thursday 9/6, we’ll turn to readings from the Pedro Pietri’s Puerto Rican Obituary PDF (also posted on the Readings page)

. Read the following poems:

  • “Puerto Rican Obituary” (Note: “Puerto Rican Obituary” is both the title of his most well-known poem and the title of the book it’s from) and “The Broken English Dream.” Be sure to read “Puerto Rican Obituary” slowly and carefully.

Watch Pietri read “Puerto Rican Obituary” here

… and here:

Think of the following questions as you read:

  • How does Pietri’s writing define the urban experience for the people he’s writing about?
  • What type of urban environment does he describe?
  • What language does he use and how does that reflect the urban situation?
  • Do you see any of the points Pietri makes in the interview reflected in the writing? Make note of a few examples.
  • Do points from the interview and poems reflect Flores’s “4 moments”? Make notes of points that do. Highlight/underline and mark specific passages in the readings.
  • What connections do you see between the poem, Juan Flores’s essay, and the interview?