Week of December 18: (Both classes) Final Exam

One big happy family for this week’s post, so one post for both sections. Yay!

Tuesday December 11 was our last class meeting for both sections. (Re)read my guide to final exams, “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF), which will help you begin to prepare for our final (and hopefully others as well). It summarizes much of what was in my prep sessions.

As a reminder, the final for the DAY CLASS is scheduled for Tuesday, December 18, 3:45-5:45 PM in the regular classroom.

The final for the NIGHT CLASS is scheduled for THURSDAY, December 20, 8-10 PM in the regular classroom.

If you want to take your exam with a different class than yours, that’s fine: just let me know and show up at the right time.

You might want to check Lehman’s exam schedule (PDF file) for your other classes as well. Be sure to arrange for childcare/ time off work/ whatever you need to do now, as there will be no make-ups, except for extraordinary circumstances. Unless you can provide a hospital or arrest record (your own, not a family member’s), you get no make-up. “My family bought plane tickets to go on vacation” or similar is not an extraordinary circumstance in my book. Consider college a job and be up front with family, friends, etc. about what that commitment means. My other class section is taking the test in the evening, however. You can take it with them if you want. email me for details on that option.

Announcement:

If I still owe you a paper, you’ll get it back via email sometime this week: same as with the first paper.

Advertisements

Week of December 11: (Night Class) Final Exam Review

Tuesday December 11 is our last class meeting. Read my guide to final exams, “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF), which will help you begin to prepare for our final (and hopefully others as well). It summarizes much of what was in my prep sessions. Think about major themes that we’ve been talking about all semester and bring questions to the class. We’ll spend the last class reflecting on the semester and have an open prep/ study session for the final exam with some group brainstorming, a little writing, and who knows what else. Be sure to show up.

As a reminder, the final is scheduled for Thursday December 20 from 8-10 PM in the regular classroom. You might want to double check Lehman’s final exam schedule (PDF file) for your other classes as well. Be sure to arrange for childcare/ time off work/ whatever you need to do now, as there will be no make-ups, except for extraordinary circumstances. Unless you can provide a hospital or arrest record (your own, not a family member’s), you get no make-up. “My family bought plane tickets to go on vacation” or similar is not an extraordinary circumstance in my book. Consider college a job and be up front with family, friends, etc. about what that commitment means. My other class section is taking the test in the afternoon on the 18th, however. You can take it with them if you want. email me for details on that option.

Announcement:

Following our conclusion of Assata, if anyone’s interested in traveling to Cuba, one option I recommend is the Venceremos Brigade. They travel every year during the summer and do so in support of the Cuban people. You’ll get to spend time with Cubans and get a very good view of the people, their society, what life is like there, and their government and social structure. Details at their website and I can put you in touch with people in New York who’ve gone on the trip and can tell you about their experience.

 

Week of December 11: (Day Class) Final Exam Review

Tuesday December 11 is our last class meeting. Read my guide to final exams, “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF), which will help you begin to prepare for our final (and hopefully others as well). It summarizes much of what was in my prep sessions. Think about major themes that we’ve been talking about all semester and bring questions to the class. We’ll spend the last class reflecting on the semester and have an open prep/ study session for the final exam with some group brainstorming, a little writing, and who knows what else. Be sure to show up.

As a reminder, the final is scheduled for Tuesday December 18, 3:45-5:45 PM in the regular classroom. You might want to double check Lehman’s final exam schedule (PDF file) for your other classes as well. Be sure to arrange for childcare/ time off work/ whatever you need to do now, as there will be no make-ups, except for extraordinary circumstances. Unless you can provide a hospital or arrest record (your own, not a family member’s), you get no make-up. “My family bought plane tickets to go on vacation” or similar is not an extraordinary circumstance in my book. Consider college a job and be up front with family, friends, etc. about what that commitment means. My other class section is taking the test in the evening, however. You can take it with them if you want. email me for details on that option.

Announcement:

Following our conclusion of Assata, if anyone’s interested in traveling to Cuba, one option I recommend is the Venceremos Brigade. They travel every year during the summer and do so in support of the Cuban people. You’ll get to spend time with Cubans and get a very good view of the people, their society, what life is like there, and their government and social structure. Details at their website and I can put you in touch with people in New York who’ve gone on the trip and can tell you about their experience.

 

Week of December 4: (Night class) Assata conclusion

220px-Assatabio

Announcements

  • The last written assignment of the semester on Angie Cruz’s Soledad is due Tuesday December 4. See the assignments page if you’ve misplaced your copy of the instruction sheet.
  • UPDATE: Fixed dates for the reading schedule below!

Also take a look at a general guide I’ve written up for final exams: “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF).

This week we finish our last book of the semester, the autobiography of Assata Shakur. For Tuesday December 4, read chapters 10-14 (pages 185-215) in Assata.

Pay close attention to the following:

  • Poems: “To My Mama” (193). Again, what do they add to the narrative? What insight do they give you about Assata’s inner thoughts?
  • What spaces/ neighborhoods does she move through? Note them and how each of them either shapes the story and what it means to Assata.
  • Keep track of major themes that emerge in the story as you read. It’s a good idea to mark examples of them in the text and make a small note in your notebook.
  • Finally, go back through your notes and start making a list of all the themes that we’ve seen this semester. It will be a good start to preparing for the final.

For Thursday December 6 finish Assata: pages 216-end of book (chapters 15-Postscript). Be sure to read the Postscript with her reflections on Havana! (Skip ahead if you must.) Again, make sure to pay attention to the various poems she includes in the story on pages 240 (“Current Events”), 259 (“To My Daughter Kakuya”), and 263 (“The Tradition”). Think also about the themes that we’ve been talking about so far and how Assata’s work fits into the context of urban narratives and themes of identity, survival, freedom, immigration/migration, return home, urban space, etc. What’s the significance of the story ending in Cuba and how does Assata adjust to her new home?

Presentation by Darlene Kriston, Tyrone, and Ashley

Consider this prep for the final exam. If you read this carefully, it’s one less thing you’ll need to study!

Looking ahead:

  • The last regular class of the semester is Tuesday December 11
  • We’ll have a formal review session in the last class on December 11
  • The final exam for your section is on Thursday December 20 from 8-10 PM in the usual classroom

Week of December 4: (Day class) Assata conclusion

220px-Assatabio

Announcements

  • The last written assignment of the semester on Angie Cruz’s Soledad is due Tuesday December 4. See the assignments page if you’ve misplaced your copy of the instruction sheet.
  • UPDATE: Fixed dates for the reading schedule below!

Also take a look at a general guide I’ve written up for final exams: “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF).

This week we finish our last book of the semester, the autobiography of Assata Shakur. For Tuesday December 4, read chapters 10-14 (pages 185-215) in Assata.

Pay close attention to the following:

  • Poems: Again, what do they add to the narrative? What insight do they give you about Assata’s inner thoughts?
  • What spaces/ neighborhoods does she move through? Note them and how each of them either shapes the story and what it means to Assata.
  • Keep track of major themes that emerge in the story as you read. It’s a good idea to mark examples of them in the text and make a small note in your notebook.
  • Finally, go back through your notes and start making a list of all the themes that we’ve seen this semester. It will be a good start to preparing for the final.

For Thursday December 6 finish Assata: pages 216-end of book (chapters 15-Postscript). Be sure to read the Postscript with her reflections on Havana! (Skip ahead if you must.) Again, make sure to pay attention to the various poems she includes in the story on pages 240 (“Current Events”), 259 (“To My Daughter Kakuya”), and 263 (“The Tradition”). Think also about the themes that we’ve been talking about so far and how Assata’s work fits into the context of urban narratives and themes of identity, survival, freedom, immigration/migration, return home, urban space, etc. What’s the significance of the story ending in Cuba and how does Assata adjust to her new home?

Presentation by Nadia, Kat, Adrianna, and Kim

Consider this prep for the final exam. If you read this carefully, it’s one less thing you’ll need to study!

Looking ahead:

  • Finish Assata on Thursday December 6
  • The last regular class of the semester is Tuesday December 11
  • We’ll have a formal review session in the last class on December 11
  • The final exam for your section is on Tuesday December 18 3:45-5:45 PM in the usual classroom

Week of November 27: (Night Class) Assata Shakur’s Autobiography

Photo: Baba Zayid Muhammad | Hank Williams

Announcements:

  • I gave out hard copies of the last written assignment of the semester. Download yours from the assignments page if you missed class. It’s due Tuesday December 4.

For Tuesday November 27, We’re going to have a guest speaker on Assata Shakur and the Black Panther Party: Baba Zayid Muhammad. To prepare, read the first 79 pages (chapters 1-4) of Assata: An Autobiography. Be sure to read the foreward by Angela Davis and Lennox Hinds. Also make sure to pay attention to the various poems she includes in the story on pages 1,17,44, and 62.

Questions to think about:

  • How effective is her style of storytelling? Does the non-linear narrative with flashbacks make the book more engaging?
  • How does Assata go about re-telling history?
  • What role do poems play in an autobiography? What do they tell you about Assata or the other people that the regular story does not?

What physical spaces and places does Assata describe in the story? What is the significance of them?

We are not primarily concerned with figuring out guilt innocence here (and in any case don’t have all the court documents to review): the goal is to read her story as we would any other autobiography and focus on how the story develops and how she develops into the person she is today. Look for clues of these things in the story.

Extra: Listen to “A Song for Assata” by Common, from his 2000 Like Water for Chocolate release, featuring CeeLo Green.

 

For Thursday November 29, read pages 80-147 (Chapters 5-9) in Assata Shakur’s Autobiography. Again, make sure to pay attention to the various poems she includes in the story on page 130 (“Love”). Think also about the themes that you should now be able to identify that we’ve been working on all semester. Note specific places in the book where they appear and mark examples of them in your text.

Presentation by Mislie, Tati, and Nadira

Week of November 27: (Day Class) Assata Shakur’s Autobiography

Announcements:

  • I gave out hard copies of the last written assignment of the semester. Download yours from the assignments page if you missed class. It’s due Tuesday December 4.

For Tuesday November 27, read the first 79 pages (chapters 1-4) of Assata: An Autobiography. Be sure to read the foreward by Angela Davis and Lennox Hinds. Also make sure to pay attention to the various poems she includes in the story on pages 1,17,44, and 62.

Questions to think about:

  • How effective is her style of storytelling? Does the non-linear narrative with flashbacks make the book more engaging?
  • How does Assata go about re-telling history?
  • What role do poems play in an autobiography? What do they tell you about Assata or the other people that the regular story does not?

What physical spaces and places does Assata describe in the story? What is the significance of them?

We are not primarily concerned with figuring out guilt innocence here (and in any case don’t have all the court documents to review): the goal is to read her story as we would any other autobiography and focus on how the story develops and how she develops into the person she is today. Look for clues of these things in the story.

Extra: Listen to “A Song for Assata” by Common, from his 2000 Like Water for Chocolate release, featuring CeeLo Green.

 

For Thursday November 29, read pages 80-147 (Chapters 5-9) in Assata Shakur’s Autobiography. Again, make sure to pay attention to the various poems she includes in the story on page 130 (“Love”). Think also about the themes that you should now be able to identify that we’ve been working on all semester. Note specific places in the book where they appear and mark examples of them in your text.

Presentation by Mislie, Tati, and Nadira