Week of December 18: (Both classes) Final Exam

One big happy family for this week’s post, so one post for both sections. Yay!

Tuesday December 11 was our last class meeting for both sections. (Re)read my guide to final exams, “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF), which will help you begin to prepare for our final (and hopefully others as well). It summarizes much of what was in my prep sessions.

As a reminder, the final for the DAY CLASS is scheduled for Tuesday, December 18, 3:45-5:45 PM in the regular classroom.

The final for the NIGHT CLASS is scheduled for THURSDAY, December 20, 8-10 PM in the regular classroom.

If you want to take your exam with a different class than yours, that’s fine: just let me know and show up at the right time.

You might want to check Lehman’s exam schedule (PDF file) for your other classes as well. Be sure to arrange for childcare/ time off work/ whatever you need to do now, as there will be no make-ups, except for extraordinary circumstances. Unless you can provide a hospital or arrest record (your own, not a family member’s), you get no make-up. “My family bought plane tickets to go on vacation” or similar is not an extraordinary circumstance in my book. Consider college a job and be up front with family, friends, etc. about what that commitment means. My other class section is taking the test in the evening, however. You can take it with them if you want. email me for details on that option.

Announcement:

If I still owe you a paper, you’ll get it back via email sometime this week: same as with the first paper.

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Week of December 4: (Night class) Assata conclusion

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Announcements

  • The last written assignment of the semester on Angie Cruz’s Soledad is due Tuesday December 4. See the assignments page if you’ve misplaced your copy of the instruction sheet.
  • UPDATE: Fixed dates for the reading schedule below!

Also take a look at a general guide I’ve written up for final exams: “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF).

This week we finish our last book of the semester, the autobiography of Assata Shakur. For Tuesday December 4, read chapters 10-14 (pages 185-215) in Assata.

Pay close attention to the following:

  • Poems: “To My Mama” (193). Again, what do they add to the narrative? What insight do they give you about Assata’s inner thoughts?
  • What spaces/ neighborhoods does she move through? Note them and how each of them either shapes the story and what it means to Assata.
  • Keep track of major themes that emerge in the story as you read. It’s a good idea to mark examples of them in the text and make a small note in your notebook.
  • Finally, go back through your notes and start making a list of all the themes that we’ve seen this semester. It will be a good start to preparing for the final.

For Thursday December 6 finish Assata: pages 216-end of book (chapters 15-Postscript). Be sure to read the Postscript with her reflections on Havana! (Skip ahead if you must.) Again, make sure to pay attention to the various poems she includes in the story on pages 240 (“Current Events”), 259 (“To My Daughter Kakuya”), and 263 (“The Tradition”). Think also about the themes that we’ve been talking about so far and how Assata’s work fits into the context of urban narratives and themes of identity, survival, freedom, immigration/migration, return home, urban space, etc. What’s the significance of the story ending in Cuba and how does Assata adjust to her new home?

Presentation by Darlene Kriston, Tyrone, and Ashley

Consider this prep for the final exam. If you read this carefully, it’s one less thing you’ll need to study!

Looking ahead:

  • The last regular class of the semester is Tuesday December 11
  • We’ll have a formal review session in the last class on December 11
  • The final exam for your section is on Thursday December 20 from 8-10 PM in the usual classroom

Week of December 4: (Day class) Assata conclusion

220px-Assatabio

Announcements

  • The last written assignment of the semester on Angie Cruz’s Soledad is due Tuesday December 4. See the assignments page if you’ve misplaced your copy of the instruction sheet.
  • UPDATE: Fixed dates for the reading schedule below!

Also take a look at a general guide I’ve written up for final exams: “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF).

This week we finish our last book of the semester, the autobiography of Assata Shakur. For Tuesday December 4, read chapters 10-14 (pages 185-215) in Assata.

Pay close attention to the following:

  • Poems: Again, what do they add to the narrative? What insight do they give you about Assata’s inner thoughts?
  • What spaces/ neighborhoods does she move through? Note them and how each of them either shapes the story and what it means to Assata.
  • Keep track of major themes that emerge in the story as you read. It’s a good idea to mark examples of them in the text and make a small note in your notebook.
  • Finally, go back through your notes and start making a list of all the themes that we’ve seen this semester. It will be a good start to preparing for the final.

For Thursday December 6 finish Assata: pages 216-end of book (chapters 15-Postscript). Be sure to read the Postscript with her reflections on Havana! (Skip ahead if you must.) Again, make sure to pay attention to the various poems she includes in the story on pages 240 (“Current Events”), 259 (“To My Daughter Kakuya”), and 263 (“The Tradition”). Think also about the themes that we’ve been talking about so far and how Assata’s work fits into the context of urban narratives and themes of identity, survival, freedom, immigration/migration, return home, urban space, etc. What’s the significance of the story ending in Cuba and how does Assata adjust to her new home?

Presentation by Nadia, Kat, Adrianna, and Kim

Consider this prep for the final exam. If you read this carefully, it’s one less thing you’ll need to study!

Looking ahead:

  • Finish Assata on Thursday December 6
  • The last regular class of the semester is Tuesday December 11
  • We’ll have a formal review session in the last class on December 11
  • The final exam for your section is on Tuesday December 18 3:45-5:45 PM in the usual classroom

Week of May 15: (Night Class) Final Exam Review

Tuesday May 15 is our last class meeting. Read my guide to final exams, “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF), which will help you begin to prepare for our final (and hopefully others as well). It summarizes much of what was in my prep sessions. Think about major themes that we’ve been talking about all semester and bring questions to the class. We’ll spend the last class reflecting on the semester and have an open prep/ study session for the final exam with some group brainstorming, a little writing, and who knows what else. Be sure to show up.

As a reminder, the final is scheduled for Thursday, May 24, 8-10 PM in the regular classroom. You might want to check Lehman’s exam schedule (PDF file) for your other classes as well. Be sure to arrange for childcare/ time off work/ whatever you need to do now, as there will be no make-ups, except for extraordinary circumstances. Unless you can provide a hospital or arrest record (your own, not a family member’s), you get no make-up. “My family bought plane tickets to go on vacation” or similar is not an extraordinary circumstance in my book. Consider college a job and be up front with family, friends, etc. about what that commitment means. My other class section is taking the test in the day, however. You can take it with them if you want–and are available. email me for details on that option.

Announcement:

The CUNY Service Corps has an opportunity to travel to Puerto Rico this summer as part of a CUNY contingent to help with the rebuilding/recovery effort. It’s anywhere from a 2-6 week commitment between June and early August. Travel, food, and housing will be provided. You’ll also get college credit and they say a stipend will be offered. See the details at their website. Application deadline is May 13 so act quickly and interviews for those accepted are the week of May 21, so it’s all happening very quickly.

The Venceremos Brigade is the Cuba travel option I mentioned. the application deadline already passed (May 1), but there may be space left if you apply immediately. Details/logistics/costs at the IFCO/Pastors for Peace website. They’re the ones who run the program. I can put you in contact with people who’ve gone if you’re interested. If it doesn’t work for you this summer, file for next year. They go every year.

Week of May 15: (Day Class) Final Exam Review

Tuesday May 15 is our last class meeting. Read my guide to final exams, “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF), which will help you begin to prepare for our final (and hopefully others as well). It summarizes much of what was in my prep sessions. Think about major themes that we’ve been talking about all semester and bring questions to the class. We’ll spend the last class reflecting on the semester and have an open prep/ study session for the final exam with some group brainstorming, a little writing, and who knows what else. Be sure to show up.

As a reminder, the final is scheduled for Tuesday, May 22, 3:45-5:45 PM in the regular classroom. You might want to check Lehman’s exam schedule (PDF file) for your other classes as well. Be sure to arrange for childcare/ time off work/ whatever you need to do now, as there will be no make-ups, except for extraordinary circumstances. Unless you can provide a hospital or arrest record (your own, not a family member’s), you get no make-up. “My family bought plane tickets to go on vacation” or similar is not an extraordinary circumstance in my book. Consider college a job and be up front with family, friends, etc. about what that commitment means. My other class section is taking the test in the evening, however. You can take it with them if you want. email me for details on that option.

Announcement:

The CUNY Service Corps has an opportunity to travel to Puerto Rico this summer as part of a CUNY contingent to help with the rebuilding/recovery effort. It’s anywhere from a 2-6 week commitment between June and early August. Travel, food, and housing will be provided. You’ll also get college credit and they say a stipend will be offered. See the details at their website. Application deadline is May 13 so act quickly and interviews for those accepted are the week of May 21, so it’s all happening very quickly.

Week of May 8: (Night class) Assata conclusion

220px-Assatabio

Announcements

  • The last written assignment of the semester is due Tuesday May 8. See the assignments page if you’ve misplaced your copy of the instruction sheet.
  • For anyone interested, I’m teaching Intro to Africana Studies (AAS 166) in the fall on Wednesday nights from 6-8:40 PM. Section XW81. Search by my name or the course/section in CUNYFirst. It satisfies the “World Cultures and Global Issues” core requirement and is a gateway to a major (or minor) in Africana Studies.

Also take a look at a general guide I’ve written up for final exams: “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF).

This week we finish our last book of the semester, the autobiography of Assata Shakur. For Tuesday May 8, read chapters 13-16 (pages 195-240) in Assata.

Pay close attention to the following:

  • Poems: Again, what do they add to the narrative? What insight do they give you about Assata’s inner thoughts?
  • What spaces/ neighborhoods does she move through? Note them and how each of them either shapes the story and what it means to Assata.
  • Keep track of major themes that emerge in the story as you read. It’s a good idea to mark examples of them in the text and make a small note in your notebook.
  • Finally, go back through your notes and start making a list of all the themes that we’ve seen this semester. It will be a good start to preparing for the final.

For Thursday May 10 finish Assata: pages 241-end of book (chapters 17-Postscript). Be sure to read the Postscript with her reflections on Havana! (Skip ahead if you must.) Again, make sure to pay attention to the various poems she includes in the story on pages 240 (“Current Events”), 259 (“To My Daughter Kakuya”), and 263 (“The Tradition”). Think also about the themes that we’ve been talking about so far and how Assata’s work fits into the context of urban narratives and themes of identity, survival, freedom, immigration/migration, return home, urban space, etc. What’s the significance of the story ending in Cuba and how does Assata adjust to her new home?

Presentation by Henry and Natalie

Consider this prep for the final exam. If you read this carefully, it’s one less thing you’ll need to study!

Week of May 8: (Day class) Assata conclusion

220px-Assatabio

Announcements

  • The last written assignment of the semester is due Tuesday May 8. See the assignments page if you’ve misplaced your copy of the instruction sheet.
  • For anyone interested, I’m teaching Intro to Africana Studies (AAS 166) in the fall on Wednesday nights from 6-8:40 PM. Section XW81. Search by my name or the course/section in CUNYFirst. It satisfies the “World Cultures and Global Issues” core requirement and is a gateway to a major (or minor) in Africana Studies.

Also take a look at a general guide I’ve written up for final exams: “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF).

This week we finish our last book of the semester, the autobiography of Assata Shakur. For Tuesday May 8, read chapters 13-16 (pages 195-240) in Assata.

Pay close attention to the following:

  • Poems: Again, what do they add to the narrative? What insight do they give you about Assata’s inner thoughts?
  • What spaces/ neighborhoods does she move through? Note them and how each of them either shapes the story and what it means to Assata.
  • Keep track of major themes that emerge in the story as you read. It’s a good idea to mark examples of them in the text and make a small note in your notebook.
  • Finally, go back through your notes and start making a list of all the themes that we’ve seen this semester. It will be a good start to preparing for the final.

For Thursday May 10 finish Assata: pages 241-end of book (chapters 17-Postscript). Be sure to read the Postscript with her reflections on Havana! (Skip ahead if you must.) Again, make sure to pay attention to the various poems she includes in the story on pages 240 (“Current Events”), 259 (“To My Daughter Kakuya”), and 263 (“The Tradition”). Think also about the themes that we’ve been talking about so far and how Assata’s work fits into the context of urban narratives and themes of identity, survival, freedom, immigration/migration, return home, urban space, etc. What’s the significance of the story ending in Cuba and how does Assata adjust to her new home?

Presentation by Monique, Chae, Cheick, and Bre

Consider this prep for the final exam. If you read this carefully, it’s one less thing you’ll need to study!