Week of May 7: (Night class) Assata conclusion

220px-Assatabio

Announcements

  • The last written assignment of the semester on Angie Cruz’s Soledad is due Tuesday May 7. See the assignments page if you’ve misplaced your copy of the instruction sheet.
  • Fall 2019 course: I’m teaching a section of Intro to Africana Studies (AAS 166) in the fall on Wednesday nights from 6-8:40 PM. Look for AAS166 Section XW81 in CUNYFirst. It is 3 credits, meets once per week, and satisfies the World Cultures and Global Issues core requirement. More details at the course website or you can ask me.

Also take a look at a general guide I’ve written up for final exams: “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF).

This week we finish our last book of the semester, the autobiography of Assata Shakur. For Tuesday May 7, read chapters 10-14 (pages 148-214) in Assata.

Pay close attention to the following:

  • Poems: Again, what do they add to the narrative? What insight do they give you about Assata’s inner thoughts?
  • What spaces/ neighborhoods does she move through? Note them and how each of them either shapes the story and what it means to Assata.
  • Keep track of major themes that emerge in the story as you read. It’s a good idea to mark examples of them in the text and make a small note in your notebook.
  • Finally, go back through your notes and start making a list of all the themes that we’ve seen this semester. It will be a good start to preparing for the final.

For Thursday May 9 finish Assata: pages 215-end of book (chapters 15-Postscript). Be sure to read the Postscript with her reflections on Havana! (Skip ahead if you must.) Again, make sure to pay attention to the various poems she includes in the story on pages 240 (“Current Events”), 259 (“To My Daughter Kakuya”), and 263 (“The Tradition”). Think also about the themes that we’ve been talking about so far and how Assata’s work fits into the context of urban narratives and themes of identity, survival, freedom, immigration/migration, return home, urban space, etc. What’s the significance of the story ending in Cuba and how does Assata adjust to her new home?

Presentation by Ruth, Kelly, Bre, and Kimberly

Consider this prep for the final exam. If you read this carefully, it’s one less thing you’ll need to study!

Looking ahead:

  • Finish Assata on Thursday May 9
  • The last regular class of the semester is Tuesday May 14
  • We’ll have a formal review session in the last class on May 14
  • The final exam for your section is on Thursday May 16 8-10 PM in the usual classroom

Reminder:

  • There’s a Dominican Writers Conference at our sister school, The City College of New York in Harlem on Saturday May 4. Angie Cruz will be there on one of the panels, though isn’t scheduled to speak about Soledad. You can probably ask her questions before/after her talk, though. Conference details here.
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Week of May 7: (Day class) Assata conclusion

220px-Assatabio

Announcements

  • The last written assignment of the semester on Angie Cruz’s Soledad is due Tuesday May 7. See the assignments page if you’ve misplaced your copy of the instruction sheet.
  • Fall 2019 course: I’m teaching a section of Intro to Africana Studies (AAS 166) in the fall on Wednesday nights from 6-8:40 PM. Look for AAS166 Section XW81 in CUNYFirst. It is 3 credits, meets once per week, and satisfies the World Cultures and Global Issues core requirement. More details at the course website or you can ask me.

Also take a look at a general guide I’ve written up for final exams: “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF).

This week we finish our last book of the semester, the autobiography of Assata Shakur. For Tuesday May 7, read chapters 10-14 (pages 148-214) in Assata.

Pay close attention to the following:

  • Poems: Again, what do they add to the narrative? What insight do they give you about Assata’s inner thoughts?
  • What spaces/ neighborhoods does she move through? Note them and how each of them either shapes the story and what it means to Assata.
  • Keep track of major themes that emerge in the story as you read. It’s a good idea to mark examples of them in the text and make a small note in your notebook.
  • Finally, go back through your notes and start making a list of all the themes that we’ve seen this semester. It will be a good start to preparing for the final.

For Thursday May 9 finish Assata: pages 215-end of book (chapters 15-Postscript). Be sure to read the Postscript with her reflections on Havana! (Skip ahead if you must.) Again, make sure to pay attention to the various poems she includes in the story on pages 240 (“Current Events”), 259 (“To My Daughter Kakuya”), and 263 (“The Tradition”). Think also about the themes that we’ve been talking about so far and how Assata’s work fits into the context of urban narratives and themes of identity, survival, freedom, immigration/migration, return home, urban space, etc. What’s the significance of the story ending in Cuba and how does Assata adjust to her new home?

Presentation by Karen, Stephanie F, and William

Consider this prep for the final exam. If you read this carefully, it’s one less thing you’ll need to study!

Looking ahead:

  • Finish Assata on Thursday May 9
  • The last regular class of the semester is Tuesday May 14
  • We’ll have a formal review session in the last class on May 14
  • The final exam for your section is on Tuesday May 21 3:45-5:45 PM in the usual classroom

Reminder:

  • There’s a Dominican Writers Conference at our sister school, The City College of New York in Harlem on Saturday May 4. Angie Cruz will be there on one of the panels, though isn’t scheduled to speak about Soledad. You can probably ask her questions before/after her talk, though. Conference details here.

Week of December 4: (Night class) Assata conclusion

220px-Assatabio

Announcements

  • The last written assignment of the semester on Angie Cruz’s Soledad is due Tuesday December 4. See the assignments page if you’ve misplaced your copy of the instruction sheet.
  • UPDATE: Fixed dates for the reading schedule below!

Also take a look at a general guide I’ve written up for final exams: “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF).

This week we finish our last book of the semester, the autobiography of Assata Shakur. For Tuesday December 4, read chapters 10-14 (pages 185-215) in Assata.

Pay close attention to the following:

  • Poems: “To My Mama” (193). Again, what do they add to the narrative? What insight do they give you about Assata’s inner thoughts?
  • What spaces/ neighborhoods does she move through? Note them and how each of them either shapes the story and what it means to Assata.
  • Keep track of major themes that emerge in the story as you read. It’s a good idea to mark examples of them in the text and make a small note in your notebook.
  • Finally, go back through your notes and start making a list of all the themes that we’ve seen this semester. It will be a good start to preparing for the final.

For Thursday December 6 finish Assata: pages 216-end of book (chapters 15-Postscript). Be sure to read the Postscript with her reflections on Havana! (Skip ahead if you must.) Again, make sure to pay attention to the various poems she includes in the story on pages 240 (“Current Events”), 259 (“To My Daughter Kakuya”), and 263 (“The Tradition”). Think also about the themes that we’ve been talking about so far and how Assata’s work fits into the context of urban narratives and themes of identity, survival, freedom, immigration/migration, return home, urban space, etc. What’s the significance of the story ending in Cuba and how does Assata adjust to her new home?

Presentation by Darlene Kriston, Tyrone, and Ashley

Consider this prep for the final exam. If you read this carefully, it’s one less thing you’ll need to study!

Looking ahead:

  • The last regular class of the semester is Tuesday December 11
  • We’ll have a formal review session in the last class on December 11
  • The final exam for your section is on Thursday December 20 from 8-10 PM in the usual classroom

Week of December 4: (Day class) Assata conclusion

220px-Assatabio

Announcements

  • The last written assignment of the semester on Angie Cruz’s Soledad is due Tuesday December 4. See the assignments page if you’ve misplaced your copy of the instruction sheet.
  • UPDATE: Fixed dates for the reading schedule below!

Also take a look at a general guide I’ve written up for final exams: “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF).

This week we finish our last book of the semester, the autobiography of Assata Shakur. For Tuesday December 4, read chapters 10-14 (pages 185-215) in Assata.

Pay close attention to the following:

  • Poems: Again, what do they add to the narrative? What insight do they give you about Assata’s inner thoughts?
  • What spaces/ neighborhoods does she move through? Note them and how each of them either shapes the story and what it means to Assata.
  • Keep track of major themes that emerge in the story as you read. It’s a good idea to mark examples of them in the text and make a small note in your notebook.
  • Finally, go back through your notes and start making a list of all the themes that we’ve seen this semester. It will be a good start to preparing for the final.

For Thursday December 6 finish Assata: pages 216-end of book (chapters 15-Postscript). Be sure to read the Postscript with her reflections on Havana! (Skip ahead if you must.) Again, make sure to pay attention to the various poems she includes in the story on pages 240 (“Current Events”), 259 (“To My Daughter Kakuya”), and 263 (“The Tradition”). Think also about the themes that we’ve been talking about so far and how Assata’s work fits into the context of urban narratives and themes of identity, survival, freedom, immigration/migration, return home, urban space, etc. What’s the significance of the story ending in Cuba and how does Assata adjust to her new home?

Presentation by Nadia, Kat, Adrianna, and Kim

Consider this prep for the final exam. If you read this carefully, it’s one less thing you’ll need to study!

Looking ahead:

  • Finish Assata on Thursday December 6
  • The last regular class of the semester is Tuesday December 11
  • We’ll have a formal review session in the last class on December 11
  • The final exam for your section is on Tuesday December 18 3:45-5:45 PM in the usual classroom

Week of May 8: (Night class) Assata conclusion

220px-Assatabio

Announcements

  • The last written assignment of the semester is due Tuesday May 8. See the assignments page if you’ve misplaced your copy of the instruction sheet.
  • For anyone interested, I’m teaching Intro to Africana Studies (AAS 166) in the fall on Wednesday nights from 6-8:40 PM. Section XW81. Search by my name or the course/section in CUNYFirst. It satisfies the “World Cultures and Global Issues” core requirement and is a gateway to a major (or minor) in Africana Studies.

Also take a look at a general guide I’ve written up for final exams: “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF).

This week we finish our last book of the semester, the autobiography of Assata Shakur. For Tuesday May 8, read chapters 13-16 (pages 195-240) in Assata.

Pay close attention to the following:

  • Poems: Again, what do they add to the narrative? What insight do they give you about Assata’s inner thoughts?
  • What spaces/ neighborhoods does she move through? Note them and how each of them either shapes the story and what it means to Assata.
  • Keep track of major themes that emerge in the story as you read. It’s a good idea to mark examples of them in the text and make a small note in your notebook.
  • Finally, go back through your notes and start making a list of all the themes that we’ve seen this semester. It will be a good start to preparing for the final.

For Thursday May 10 finish Assata: pages 241-end of book (chapters 17-Postscript). Be sure to read the Postscript with her reflections on Havana! (Skip ahead if you must.) Again, make sure to pay attention to the various poems she includes in the story on pages 240 (“Current Events”), 259 (“To My Daughter Kakuya”), and 263 (“The Tradition”). Think also about the themes that we’ve been talking about so far and how Assata’s work fits into the context of urban narratives and themes of identity, survival, freedom, immigration/migration, return home, urban space, etc. What’s the significance of the story ending in Cuba and how does Assata adjust to her new home?

Presentation by Henry and Natalie

Consider this prep for the final exam. If you read this carefully, it’s one less thing you’ll need to study!

Week of May 8: (Day class) Assata conclusion

220px-Assatabio

Announcements

  • The last written assignment of the semester is due Tuesday May 8. See the assignments page if you’ve misplaced your copy of the instruction sheet.
  • For anyone interested, I’m teaching Intro to Africana Studies (AAS 166) in the fall on Wednesday nights from 6-8:40 PM. Section XW81. Search by my name or the course/section in CUNYFirst. It satisfies the “World Cultures and Global Issues” core requirement and is a gateway to a major (or minor) in Africana Studies.

Also take a look at a general guide I’ve written up for final exams: “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF).

This week we finish our last book of the semester, the autobiography of Assata Shakur. For Tuesday May 8, read chapters 13-16 (pages 195-240) in Assata.

Pay close attention to the following:

  • Poems: Again, what do they add to the narrative? What insight do they give you about Assata’s inner thoughts?
  • What spaces/ neighborhoods does she move through? Note them and how each of them either shapes the story and what it means to Assata.
  • Keep track of major themes that emerge in the story as you read. It’s a good idea to mark examples of them in the text and make a small note in your notebook.
  • Finally, go back through your notes and start making a list of all the themes that we’ve seen this semester. It will be a good start to preparing for the final.

For Thursday May 10 finish Assata: pages 241-end of book (chapters 17-Postscript). Be sure to read the Postscript with her reflections on Havana! (Skip ahead if you must.) Again, make sure to pay attention to the various poems she includes in the story on pages 240 (“Current Events”), 259 (“To My Daughter Kakuya”), and 263 (“The Tradition”). Think also about the themes that we’ve been talking about so far and how Assata’s work fits into the context of urban narratives and themes of identity, survival, freedom, immigration/migration, return home, urban space, etc. What’s the significance of the story ending in Cuba and how does Assata adjust to her new home?

Presentation by Monique, Chae, Cheick, and Bre

Consider this prep for the final exam. If you read this carefully, it’s one less thing you’ll need to study!

Week of 12/5: (Night class) Assata, continued

220px-AssatabioAnnouncements: The assignment sheet for our final paper of the semester due 12/18 is on the assignments page. Go download it if you don’t have a copy.

Also take a look at a general guide I’ve written up for exams, “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF).

This week we continue with our last book of the semester, the autobiography of Assata Shakur. For Tuesday 12/5, read chapters 10-13, (pages 148-208) in Assata.

Pay close attention to the following:

  • Poems: “Culture” (159), and “To My Mama” (193). Again, what do they add to the narrative? What insight do they give you about Assata’s inner thoughts?
  • Also think about her Fourth of July address on pages 167-170.
  • What spaces/ neighborhoods does she move through? Note them and how each of them either shapes the story and what it means to Assata.
  • Keep track of major themes that emerge in the story as you read. It’s a good idea to mark examples of them in the text and make a small note in your notebook.
  • Finally, go back through your notes and start making a list of all the themes that we’ve seen this semester. It will be a good start to preparing for the final.

For Thursday 12/7 finish Assata: chapters 14-Postscript (pages 208-274). Be sure to read the Postscript with her reflections on Havana! (Skip ahead if you must.) Again, make sure to pay attention to the various poems she includes in the story on pages 240 (“Current Events”), 259 (“To My Daughter Kakuya”), and 263 (“The Tradition”). Think also about the themes that we’ve been talking about so far and how Assata’s work fits into the context of urban narratives and themes of identity, survival, freedom, immigration/migration, return home, urban space, etc. What’s the significance of the story ending in Cuba and how does Assata adjust to her new home?

Presentation by Tyrone, Kevin, Bris, and Mercy

Consider this prep for the final exam. If you read this carefully, it’s one less thing you’ll need to study!

Reminder: the final exam is Thursday December 14 from 8-10 PM. See the Registrar’s full schedule (PDF!) to find your other classes.