Final Exam: 12/22 3:45-5:45

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Some quick updates this week:

  • While we don’t have formal classes next week, I’ll have special office hours during class time on Tuesday 12/15 and Thursday 12/17. Office is Carman 398. We can also chat via Skype/Google Hangouts during those times. email me for an appointment if you want to do the online option.
  • I’ll be emailing papers back to whatever address you used to send it to me. Look out for it.

     
    As a reminder, the final is scheduled for Tuesday, December 22, 3:45-5:45 PM in the regular classroom. in the regular classroom and you might want to check Lehman’s exam schedule (PDF file) for your other classes as well. Be sure to arrange for childcare/ time off work/ whatever you need to do now, as there will be no make-ups, except for extraordinary circumstances. Unless you can provide a hospital or arrest record (your own, not a family member’s), you get no make-up. “My family bought plane tickets to go on vacation” or similar is not an extraordinary circumstance in my book. Consider college a job and be up front with family, friends, etc. about what that commitment means.
    The last class was a formal review session for the final. I won’t post detailed notes for that online or answer e-mails on it since I’ve already spent a lot of time on prep, so please get notes from a classmate who was there if you missed it.

    About the final exam …

  • You’re encouraged to (re)read my guide to final exams, “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF) if you haven’t already.
  • Format is 3 essays around major themes we’ve seen in readings all semester. Refer to the handout of the sample exam and question handed out in class for specifics.
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    Week of 12/10: Assata conclusion and Final exam review

    220px-AssatabioRemember that papers are due Friday 12/6 by Midnight Eastern Standard Time via e-mail. This week we finish the autobiography of Assata Shakur. For Tuesday 12/10, finish Assata. Again, make sure to pay attention to the various poems she includes in the story on pages 240 (“Current Events”), 259 (“To My Daughter Kakuya”), and 263 (“The Tradition”). Think also about the themes that we’ve been talking about so far and how Assata’s work fits into the context of urban narratives and themes of immigration/migration, return home, urban space, etc. Consider this prep for the final exam. If you read this carefully, it’s one less thing you’ll need to study.

    For Thursday 12/12 (re)read my guide to final exams, “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF), which will help you begin to prepare for our final (and hopefully others as well). Think about major themes that we’ve been talking about all semester and bring questions to the class. We’ll spend the last class reflecting on the semester and have an open prep/ study session for the final exam.

    As a reminder, the final is scheduled for Tuesday, December 17, 3:45-5:45 PM in the regular classroom. Be sure to arrange for childcare/ time off work/ whatever you need to do now, as there will be no make-ups, except for extraordinary circumstances. Unless you can provide a hospital or arrest record (your own, not a family member’s), you get no make-up. “My family bought plane tickets to go on vacation” or similar is not an extraordinary circumstance in my book. Consider college a job and be up front with family, friends, etc. about what that commitment means.

    Week of May 6: Assata, continued

    220px-AssatabioThis week we continue with our last book of the semester, the autobiography of Assata Shakur. For Monday 5/6, read my guide to final exams, “Zen and the Art of Finals” (PDF), which will help you begin to prepare for our final (and hopefully others as well). In Assata, read pages 118-172 (chapters 7-11). Again, make sure to pay attention to the various poems she includes in the story on pages 130 (“Love”), 140 (“Stranger”), 146 (“Leftovers: What is Left”), 159 (“Culture”) and 163-4. Think also about the themes that Don Ramon of Rutgers raised in his talk today and if these return in the text. Think about her long speech to the court on pages 166-70. What does this show about her development as a person and a woman? Also think about what the “American Dream” represents to her.

    s200_mary.phillipsFor Wednesday 5/8 Mary Phillips of Lehman’s African and African American Studies Department joins us as a guest speaker for Assata. She’ll discuss Assata as a Black Feminist text and talk about some of the political aspects of the book. Read pages 173-215 (chapters 12-14) to prepare. Pay attention to the “To My Momma” poem on p. 193 and her description of her time as a CUNY student.